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Producing stable high-efficiency perovskite solar cells, a significant step

Spiro-OMeTAD ion-modulated radical doping for more stable and effective perovskite solar cells.

Perovskites-based solar cells are beginning to match the efficiency of conventional silicon-based solar cells in terms of output. They simultaneously benefit from low costs and quick energy payback times. Such solar cells do have stability issues, albeit these issues have recently been resolved by researchers. The findings represent a significant advancement in the search for solar cells of the future.

 

Producing stable high-efficiency perovskite solar cells, a significant step


 

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Perovskites-based solar cells are beginning to match the performance of conventional silicon-based solar cells in terms of efficiency. They simultaneously benefit from low costs and quick energy payback times. However, these solar cells have stability issues, which Linköping University researchers have recently resolved with the help of international collaborators. The findings, which were reported in Science, represent a significant advance in the development of solar cells of the future.

 

"Our findings present fresh opportunities for the creation of reliable and effective solar cells. Additionally, they offer fresh perceptions into the operation of doping in organic semiconductors "says Feng Gao, professor at Linköping University's Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM).

 

Crystalline substances called perovskites have a great deal of potential to help end the world's energy crisis. They are light, very effective, and inexpensive to produce. It has not been able to create high-efficiency perovskite-based solar cells with the necessary stability due to the perovskite solar cells' rapid degradation.

 

"High efficiency and stability appear to be trade-offs in perovskite-based solar cells. Perovskite solar cells with high efficiency frequently exhibit low stability, and vice versa "As one of the main authors of the research that was published in Science, Tiankai Zhang, a postdoc at IFM, puts it.

 

In perovskite-based solar cells, one or more charge transport layers are often required when solar energy is transformed into electricity. In the solar cell, these are located just close to the perovskite layer. Auxiliary molecules are frequently required for the organic charge transport layers to work as intended. The substance is referred to as "doped."

 

Spiro-OMeTAD, a benchmark doped transport layer for perovskite solar cells, achieves record power conversion efficiencies. However, the current method for injecting Spiro-OMeTAD is cumbersome and contributes to the instability problem with perovskite solar cells.

 

"With the use of a new doping method for Spiro-OMeTAD, we have now been able to completely eliminate the trade-off that had hampered progress. Due to this, we are able to achieve great efficiency and good stability "Tiankai Zhang states.

 

Feng Wang, a junior lecturer at IFM, is another major author of the article. He draws attention to the various applications and uses for perovskite-based solar cells.

 

"Utilizing perovskites has the benefit of producing thin solar cells that are light and flexible. They might even be partially translucent. Perovskite-based solar cells could be used, for instance, to cover huge windows or the outside of buildings. For this use, silicon-based solar cells are too hefty "Feng Wang argues.

 

The Swedish Research Council, an ERC Starting Grant, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, and Linköping University's AFM (the Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials) have all provided funding for the project. Additionally a Wallenberg Academy Fellow is Feng Gao.

 

 

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Materials provided by Linköping University. Original written by Anders Törneholm. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

 


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